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Utility-scale solar in 2014: Unpredictable, diverse and counting down to ITC sunset

2014 was utility-scale solar’s most successful year ever, with 115 projects of 5 megawatts (MW) or more completed for a total of 3,550 MW. It was also the year when utility-scale solar stopped being predictable as the market's underlying geographic, system capacity and policy trends underwent some noticeable changes.

Utility solar's record 2014 Q4: More projects, more diversity

The utility-scale solar market, the segment that has led the dramatic growth of solar in the United States over the past few years, continued to expand in the fourth quarter of 2014, according to analysis conducted by the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA). Beyond newly added solar capacity, we see signs of emerging markets for solar outside California and the Southwest, and some significant changes in the contractual structure of projects.

Electric co-ops get creative to finance solar

Across the United States, electric cooperatives serving rural areas and small towns are fielding a growing number of requests from their owner-members to provide options for them to use solar energy. But as nonprofit businesses that cannot take advantage of the 30-percent federal income tax credit, co-ops have had to come up with smart, creative ways to finance and deliver solar power at competitive prices.

Fortune 500 companies power up renewables -- are utilities in the mix?

A growing number of Fortune 500 companies are putting their dollars into energy efficiency and renewables to reduce their carbon footprints -- and getting a better return on their money than from their traditional investments. In many cases, they are looking to renewable energy to meet their carbon reduction targets, often opting for direct ownership or third-party power purchase agreements (PPAs) for wind, solar and other clean energy and leaving utilities out of the picture.